Browsing articles in "Event"
Feb
28
2014

Water Luncheon Seminar

Assessing the Impact of Increased Climate Variability and Land Use Change on the Water and Nutrient Budget of the Upper Walnut Creek: Downscaling Climate Models to Drive Watershed Models

Gaj Sivandran, Assistant Professor, Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, http://ecohydrology.wordpress.com/

WHEN: April 16, 2014;  11:30 am – 1:00 pm

WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


Non-point source pollution causes millions of dollars each year in impairment to surface waters in the United States, the largest contributing source being from agricultural runoff.  Due to the complex coupled process interactions within the biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles, the spatial and temporal extent of non-point source pollution can be difficult to assess and quantify.  See full abstract here.

 

Feb
27
2014

Soil and Water Conservation Society Winter Meeting

All Ohio Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society Winter Meeting & Conference

“Can Agriculture Significantly Reduce Off-Site Movement of Soluble Nutrients?”

Monday, March 17, 2014 – 8:30 am to 4:40 pm

Ohio Department of Agriculture – Bromfield Auditorium

8995 East Main Street; Reynoldsburg, Ohio


The emphasis of the presentations at this year’s conference will be discussing technologies and techniques to reduce off-site movement of nutrients and the barriers to their adoption and implementation. This conference is open to any conservation and agriculture professionals interested in reducing the off-site movement of nutrients.

This daylong event has been pre-approved for Certified Crop Advisor Continuing Education Units in the following categories: 5 hours of Soil & Water Management and 1 hour of Nutrient Management.  For more information on the agenda, cost, and registration, view the meeting flyer.

 

Dec
16
2013

Water Luncheon Seminar

Green-Gray Decentralized Detention Infrastructure to Control Combined Sewer Overflows

Nestor Alonso Mancipe-Munoz, University of Cincinnati, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering.

WHEN: January 21, 2014 – 11:30am-1:00pm
WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


Register online here or download abstract and registration form.

Combined sewer overflows (CSO) are uncontrolled and untreated discharges of wastewater into urban streams that occur when the capacity of the collection system or the treatment facility are exceeded during heavy rainfall or snowmelt events.  Resilient and affordable solutions are needed to control CSOs and help manage urban flooding and improve water quality.  Typically, Gray infrastructure (i.e. sewers and treatment facilities) are proposed to mitigate CSO impacts.  A more environmentally friendly approach called Green  infrastructure (i.e. bio-infiltration, green roofs, rain gardens, etc) is being considered to solve this problem.  Interest has grown in using a combination of “green” and “gray” infrastructure because it not only mitigates CSOs, but also maximizes social, economic, and environmental benefits.  A unique framework that combines state-of-the-art mathematical modeling complemented with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) was developed to assess a non-conventional “green” and “gray” infrastructure alternative, composed of short storm sewers (gray) that  convey stormwater runoff into small decentralized detention ponds (green).  The detention ponds release the captured runoff back into the existing sewer at a constant rate controlled to  prevent the occurrence of a  downstream CSO.  The proposed framework includes methods to calibrate a high resolution rainfall-runoff model, identify potential sites for small detention ponds, and produce control-operation policies.  Results show that the green-gray infrastructure alternative is feasible and provides a higher CSO reduction at a lower cost than a conventional “gray only” alternative for a typical rainfall year.  The framework provides a useful promising tool for evaluating effectiveness, feasibility, and operation-control of this alternative in urban areas to reduce CSOs.

Oct
17
2013

42nd Annual WMAO Conference

Now Trending: Innovations in Water Resource Management

WHEN: November 13 & 14, 2013
WHERE: Quest Conference Center, 8405 Pulsar Place, Columbus, OH 43240 (map)



Proceedings WMAO 2013 Conference

Conference Agenda WMAO 2013

 


Hotel Tax Exemption Information

If you will be staying at a Columbus hotel for the 42nd Annual WMAO Conference and are eligible for relief from the City of Columbus Hotel Tax, please provide a completed H‐3GOV City of Columbus Hotel/Motel Excise Tax Exemption Certificate AND Ohio Sales and Use Tax Blanket Exemption Certificate upon check in at the hotel.  These documents are linked below for your use.

Please be aware that payment for overnight accommodations must be made by an organization credit card or check ‐ any personal credit cards or cash will void tax exemption.

Reservations, tax form submittal, and payment are the responsibility of conference attendee.

H-3GOV City of Columbus Hotel/Motel Excise Tax Exemption Certificate

Ohio Sales and Use Tax Blanket Exemption Certificate

 

 

Sep
15
2013

WMAO / OWRC Water Luncheon

Anthropogenic Unintended Consequences: Phosphorus and Alum in Grand Lake St. Marys, Ohio.

Chad Hammerschmidt, Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University; http://www.wright.edu/ees/hammerschmidt/

WHEN: October 15, 2013 – 11:30am-1:00pm

WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


Grand Lake St. Marys was constructed in the 1840s to serve as a reservoir for the Miami and Erie Canal.  Since then, but particularly during the past three decades, water quality in the lake has been deteriorated   by inputs of phosphorus, which have resulted in toxic blooms of cyanobacteria.  Our research shows that  over 80% of the current-day phosphorus loadings to the lake are in watershed runoff that can be attributed  mostly to agricultural operations.  The remedy to eutrophication of Grand Lake is cessation of watershed   inputs of phosphorus.  In addition to watershed initiatives focused on reduction of agricultural nutrient inputs, the State applied about 2 million pounds of alum (aluminum sulfate) to the lake in 2011 in an attempt to remove phosphorus from the water column and mitigate fluxes from sediments.  We found that the alum had little effect on phosphorus levels in lake water and that the aluminum and sulfate may negatively alter benthic communities.

Luncheon Brochure.

Register Here.

 

Jul
18
2013

EPN’s 2nd Tuesdays Breakfast Club

Helping Restore a Central Ohio Gem: the Olentangy River 5th Ave. Dam Removal Project

WHEN: August 13, 2013 – 7:15am – 9:30am
WHERE: Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (map)


More Information

 

Sponsored by the Ohio Dam Safety Organization, a Division of WMAO

Jul
3
2013

2013 Ohio Statewide Floodplain Management Conference

Conference and Advanced HEC-RAS Training

WHEN: August 28 & 29, 2013
WHERE: Doubletree Hotel, Columbus/Worthington (map)


Agenda

Register

 

Jun
24
2013

WMAO Water Luncheon

Stream Restoration by Fluvial Biogeomorphic Succession: Applications of a self-forming stream design concept in Ohio.

Dan Mecklenburg, Ecological Engineer, ODNR Division of Soil and Water Resources.

WHEN: July16, 2013 – 11:30am-1:00pm
WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


The self-forming stream design approach was evaluated on nine reaches in Ohio that are typical of stream restoration projects in the region. The aim of self-forming stream restoration is to construct a channel form that is consistent with an intermediate stage of channel evolution models with the expectation that subsequent successional stages and beneficial processes will follow, and conclude with a stream that is hydrogeomorphically fit to its catchment. This essentially entailed the construction of a roughly planar surface with a stable longitudinal slope and sufficient width to allow a depositional response. Repeated geomorphological surveys were conducted to track change through time.

 

Learn more.

 

Mar
14
2013

WMAO Water Luncheon

Creating Value from Waste: Results of a Nutrient Recovery Pilot for the City of Columbus

WHEN: April 16, 2013 – 11:30am-1:00pm
WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


The City of Columbus has evaluated the application of Ostara’s Pearl® Nutrient Recovery Process to recover nutrients and prevent struvite scale formation at the Southerly WWTP. They have also evaluated a similar application of the Multiform Harvest Nutrient Recovery System at the Jackson Pike WWTP. These processes are based on the initiation and control of struvite precipitation within an upflow fluidized bed reactor, utilizing nutrients like phosphorus and ammonia already present in wastewater dewatering operations. The rate of struvite formation is controlled in the process so that a range of products can be produced, ranging from a soft, sandy consistency up to a high quality product with desired physical properties (size, hardness, purity etc.), which can then be sold as fertilizer.

Have a question about this presentation? Contact skeckenwiler@columbus.gov
Presentation (.PDF)
Learn More

 

Dec
12
2012

WMAO Water Luncheon – NEW LOCATION

Low-cost Treatment of Turkey-processing Wastewater

WHEN: January 15, 2013
WHERE: Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Heffner Building, Columbus, OH (map)


Over $10 million dollars has been saved by an Ohio meat processor by treating their wastewater in a new way. A sand bioreactor system was developed based on research conducted at The Ohio State University. This university/industry partnership has saved jobs, money and is
protecting the environment with effluents exceeding the quality of conventional treatment systems. Quiet, clean and simple are the best words to describe the appearance of the new sand bioreactor system constructed at the meat processing facility. Some people might mistake the
treatment system for a park. No odor is a feature neighbors most appreciate.

Learn More

 

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